Vitamin D: A possible ally in the fight against diabetes

McMaster Optimal Aging Team

The many positive health impacts of vitamin D have dominated the supplement world in recent years. Similarly, the growing worldwide epidemic of type 2 diabetes has also been in the spotlight – with an estimated 400 million people affected currently, and this number expected to be 642 million by 2040. As type 2 diabetes rates continue to soar, there is an urgent need to find effective ways to tackle this disease. Vitamin D supplementation has emerged as a possible solution. But how effective is it really?

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Mitochondrial Correction: A New Therapeutic Paradigm for Cancer and Degenerative Diseases

Michael J Gonzalez; Thomas Seyfried; Garth L Nicolson; Barry J Barclay; Jamie Matta; Alex Vasquez; Dominic D’Agostino; Jose Olalde; Jorge Duconage; Ronald Hunninghake; Miguel J Berdiel; Amanda Cintrón

Cancer and other degenerative diseases are increasing to epidemic proportions in all industrialized countries. Many of these degenerative diseases show some familial association, thus a genetic basis has been assumed. Yet, the nature and frequency of genetic variants in the human population has not changed significantly in the past 50 years, even though the incidence of these diseases has climbed continuously (Wallace, 2005). Therefore, because the increased and increasing incidence of cancer cannot be attributed to population-wide genetic change during this short timeframe, the cause must be external to the genome, in the “environment”, which with relation to diet and chemical exposures, has altered radically in the past few decades.

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The Driving Force Behind the Dietary Guidelines

Belinda Fettke

A fascinating look at the ideology of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, and their subsequent influence on nutrition ‘science’ and dietary guidelines, world-wide.  Most of us only look back as far as Ancel Keys to determine where it all went wrong, but few look back further to see what or who influenced him and others to passionately push the dogma that grains are good and fat is bad!

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The Nitrate and Nitrite Myth: Another Reason Not To Fear Bacon

Chris Kresser

Beyond just being loaded with “artery-clogging saturated fat” and sodium, bacon has been long considered unhealthy due to the use of nitrates and nitrites in the curing process. Many conventional doctors, and well-meaning friends and relatives, will say you’re basically asking for a heart attack or cancer.  Chris Kresser debunks this Myth and, if you have the time, the comments thread is a hilarious read.

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Fibre is NOT a necessity for a healthy diet! Can this be True?

Doug Reynolds

When Dr. Paul Mason made the statement during his talk at Low Carb Down Under this year that “Fibre is NOT a necessity for a healthy diet!” there was a discernible unrest amongst the crowd.  How could this be true?  Fibre is essential to avoid constipation, right?  Apparently this is not the case and Dr. Mason debunks the myths during a fantastic talk.

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The Grinch, The WHO, Red Meat and Cancer: A Holiday Poem

Georgia Ede, MD

In October, twenty-two scientists from ten countries met at the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) in Lyon, France, to evaluate the link between processed and red meat and cancer. The result was a highly-publicized press release by the World Health Organization (WHO) declaring processed meat as “carcinogenic to humans” and red meat as “probably carcinogenic to humans.”

Dr. Ede went over the WHO report with a fine tooth comb and can confidently reassure you that there is absolutely no proof that meat of any kind causes cancer in humans or animals. In the spirit of this joyous holiday season,  a poem inspired by the beloved story “How the Grinch Stole Christmas” by the incomparable Dr. Seuss.  Her complete analysis of the report can be found here.

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WHO Says Meat Causes Cancer?

Georgia Ede, MD

The World Health Organization (WHO) released a two-page report entitled Carcinogenicity of Consumption of Red and Processed Meat, warning the planet that processed meat definitely causes colorectal cancer in humans, and that red meat “probably” causes colorectal cancer in humans. The report listed a total of 20 scientific references. WHO’s frightening anti-meat proclamation made headlines worldwide and had a major impact on how people think about meat and health………I read the report and all of the experimental studies cited in the report. I found no scientific evidence to support the WHO’s anti-meat cries, and I think it is important to set the record straight.

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Cranberries for UTI prevention: Crimson Crusader or Juicy Gossip?

Georgia Ede, MD

The holiday table would look dull, lifeless, and naked without an intensely colorful, jellied, saucy, free-form, or cylindrical cranberry side dish. We believe in the festive and medicinal properties of these sour little berries, so let’s take a closer look and see whether they are truly the crimson crusaders of our dreams.

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Does Carnitine from Red Meat Cause Heart Disease?

Georgia Ede, MD

A few days ago, a brand new study by Dr. Stanley Hazen’s group at the Cleveland Clinic was published, incriminating an unfamiliar ingredient within red meat as the cause of heart disease.  The New York Times trumpeted: “CULPRIT IN HEART DISEASE GOES BEYOND MEAT’S FAT“.  This article received a lot of attention, so I was asked by readers and friends to comment on it.  This new study is actually a conglomeration of mouse experiments, human clinical studies, and human epidemiological studies, which the authors then weave together to make their case against red meat.  Straightforward it is NOT. It is a many-headed beast, armed with tentacles and suckers, but is smart, elegant in many ways, and deserving of detailed scrutiny.

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Do High-Fat Diets Cause Depression?

Georgia Ede, MD

A study was published in the British Journal of Pharmacology and is entitled “High fat diet-induced metabolic disorders impairs serotonergic function and anxiety-like behaviours in mice.”  We have been (wrongly) told for decades by public health officials that dietary fat is unhealthy, so we tend to take articles that support this belief at face value, without question.  But before you clear your cupboards of all fatty foods, hoping for eternal happiness and tranquility, let me tell you why the results of this MOUSE study need not cause you any additional depression and anxiety.

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Do Smoothies Make You Sharper or Is It Just Juicy Gossip?

Georgia Ede, MD

The Times of London published an article entitled “Eat Yourself Smarter? Try dark chocolate, green salad — and gum

Articles like this one always get my goat (maybe that’s why I haven’t seen my goat in such a long time).  Create a hopeful headline, toss in a bunch of studies that support your headline (without references so I have to dig my way through PubMed to find them), interview an expert researcher or two for some quick enticing quotes, and then take a wildly irresponsible leap into making specific and appealing recommendations about what people should eat/drink to be smarter.  Often, including in this case, these prescriptions for brain health are not only wrong, they are dangerously wrong.

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New Study Finds Saturated Fat Causes PTSD… or Does It?

Georgia Ede, MD

We’ve been told for decades that saturated fat is public health enemy number one. It’s been easy for us to buy this argument because it sounds so simple,  obvious and logical: eating fat should make us fat. Since we know that obesity is associated with all kinds of other serious health conditions, it has been tempting for researchers and the general public to blame saturated fat for all of the diseases we fear most.

Dr. Georgia Ede exposes this headline seeking, sad excuse for a paper for what it really is:  At best it’s sloppy and biased, at worst it’s scientific malpractice.

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Is the Ketogenic Diet Safe for Everyone?

Georgia Ede, MD

If you have a brain, you need to know about ketogenic diets. The fact that these specially-formulated low-carbohydrate diets have the power to stop seizures in their tracks is concrete evidence that food has a tremendous impact on brain chemistry and should inspire curiosity about how they work.

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How the Mid-Victorians Worked, Ate and Died

Paul Clayton; and Judith Rowbotham

Analysis of the mid-Victorian period in the U.K. reveals that life expectancy at age 5 was as good or better than exists today, and the incidence of degenerative disease was 10% of ours. Their levels of physical activity and hence calorific intakes were approximately twice ours. They had relatively little access to alcohol and tobacco; and due to their correspondingly high intake of fruits, whole grains, oily fish and vegetables, they consumed levels of micro- and phytonutrients at approximately ten times the levels considered normal today. This paper relates the nutritional status of the mid-Victorians to their freedom from degenerative disease; and extrapolates recommendations for the cost-effective improvement of public health today.

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What Is Cholesterol?

Georgia Ede, MD

Poor cholesterol—so misunderstood. All animal cells require cholesterol for proper structure and function. The vast majority of cholesterol in the body does not come directly from foods like eggs and meat, but from the liver, which can make cholesterol out of anything we eat. So, if cholesterol-rich foods don’t cause high cholesterol, what does?

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How a Low-Carb Diet Might Aid People With Type 1 Diabetes

New York Times (Anahad O’Connor)

The standard approach for people with Type 1 diabetes is to match carb intake with insulin. But the argument for restricting carbs is that it keeps blood sugar more stable and requires less insulin, resulting in fewer highs and lows. The approach has not been widely studied or embraced for Type 1 diabetes, but some patients swear by it.

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Ketogenic Diet May Be Key to Cancer Recovery

Dr. Mercola

To some, a ketogenic diet amounts to nothing less than a drug-free cancer treatment. The diet calls for eliminating carbohydrates, replacing them with healthy fats and protein.  The premise is that since cancer cells need glucose to thrive, and carbohydrates turn into glucose in your body, then cutting out carbs literally starves the cancer cells.

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Ketosis cleans our cells

Dr. Michael Eades

Now, all we have to do to slow the aging process is to stay in some degree of ketosis most of the time and let nature take her course and clean all the junk out of our cellular attics. How do we do that? Easy. Keep our carbohydrate intake at (or preferably below) 100 grams or so per day.

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New Year’s Eve Tango House Party » Scientists see potential in “ketogenic diet” for aging longevity

Marina M. Pearsall, MD, PhD; Gurney F Pearsall Jr, MD

Scientists from Gladstones Institutes have unearthed a specific compound that acts as “the body’s major source of energy during exercise or fasting,” says senior investigator Dr. Eric Verdin. This mechanism, known as β-hydroxybutyrate, works by blocking a chemical process that increases oxidative stress on the body’s cells.

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Ketones and Carbohydrates: Can they co-exist?

Peter Attia, MD

For reasons I’m still struggling to understand, the idea of “nutritional ketosis” (NK, to be distinguished from starvation ketosis, SK or diabetic ketoacidosis, DKA) is often discussed and debated in much the same way as religion or politics.  Perhaps this can be said of all nutrition, which is a shame.  Nevertheless, in my continued defiance of such sensitive topics, I’d like to add another layer of complexity and nuance to this discussion.

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