Cholesterol / CVD

Does Carnitine from Red Meat Cause Heart Disease?

Georgia Ede, MD

A few days ago, a brand new study by Dr. Stanley Hazen’s group at the Cleveland Clinic was published, incriminating an unfamiliar ingredient within red meat as the cause of heart disease.  The New York Times trumpeted: “CULPRIT IN HEART DISEASE GOES BEYOND MEAT’S FAT“.  This article received a lot of attention, so I was asked by readers and friends to comment on it.  This new study is actually a conglomeration of mouse experiments, human clinical studies, and human epidemiological studies, which the authors then weave together to make their case against red meat.  Straightforward it is NOT. It is a many-headed beast, armed with tentacles and suckers, but is smart, elegant in many ways, and deserving of detailed scrutiny.

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New Study Finds Saturated Fat Causes PTSD… or Does It?

Georgia Ede, MD

We’ve been told for decades that saturated fat is public health enemy number one. It’s been easy for us to buy this argument because it sounds so simple,  obvious and logical: eating fat should make us fat. Since we know that obesity is associated with all kinds of other serious health conditions, it has been tempting for researchers and the general public to blame saturated fat for all of the diseases we fear most.

Dr. Georgia Ede exposes this headline seeking, sad excuse for a paper for what it really is:  At best it’s sloppy and biased, at worst it’s scientific malpractice.

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How the Mid-Victorians Worked, Ate and Died

Paul Clayton; and Judith Rowbotham

Analysis of the mid-Victorian period in the U.K. reveals that life expectancy at age 5 was as good or better than exists today, and the incidence of degenerative disease was 10% of ours. Their levels of physical activity and hence calorific intakes were approximately twice ours. They had relatively little access to alcohol and tobacco; and due to their correspondingly high intake of fruits, whole grains, oily fish and vegetables, they consumed levels of micro- and phytonutrients at approximately ten times the levels considered normal today. This paper relates the nutritional status of the mid-Victorians to their freedom from degenerative disease; and extrapolates recommendations for the cost-effective improvement of public health today.

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What Is Cholesterol?

Georgia Ede, MD

Poor cholesterol—so misunderstood. All animal cells require cholesterol for proper structure and function. The vast majority of cholesterol in the body does not come directly from foods like eggs and meat, but from the liver, which can make cholesterol out of anything we eat. So, if cholesterol-rich foods don’t cause high cholesterol, what does?

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