NeuroProtection

The Truth About Low-Protein, High-Carb Diets and Brain Aging

Georgia Ede, MD

Do you need to worry about that new study claiming that LOW-protein, HIGH-carbohydrate diets are better for brain health? Have some fun peeking behind the curtain to see what these scientists actually did and decide for yourself whether it’s going to be meat or muffins for you…

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Is the Ketogenic Diet Safe for Everyone?

Georgia Ede, MD

If you have a brain, you need to know about ketogenic diets. The fact that these specially-formulated low-carbohydrate diets have the power to stop seizures in their tracks is concrete evidence that food has a tremendous impact on brain chemistry and should inspire curiosity about how they work.

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How the Mid-Victorians Worked, Ate and Died

Paul Clayton; and Judith Rowbotham

Analysis of the mid-Victorian period in the U.K. reveals that life expectancy at age 5 was as good or better than exists today, and the incidence of degenerative disease was 10% of ours. Their levels of physical activity and hence calorific intakes were approximately twice ours. They had relatively little access to alcohol and tobacco; and due to their correspondingly high intake of fruits, whole grains, oily fish and vegetables, they consumed levels of micro- and phytonutrients at approximately ten times the levels considered normal today. This paper relates the nutritional status of the mid-Victorians to their freedom from degenerative disease; and extrapolates recommendations for the cost-effective improvement of public health today.

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Nutrition and Traumatic Brain Injury: Improving Acute and Subacute Health Outcomes in Military Personnel

John Erdman, Maria Oria, and Laura Pillsbury, Editors: Institute of Medicine Of The National Academies

The ketogenic diet is composed of 80–90 percent fat and provides adequate protein but limited carbohydrates (Gasior et al., 2006).  In normal metabolism, carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, but in the presence of carbohydrate restriction, fatty acid oxidation becomes favored, and the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies that serve as an efficient alternative fuel for brain cells.

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